Resume Writing Tips

First, the good news. You do not have to be a world-famous author to compose a solid, well-organized, professional-looking resume. All you need is the ability to express your ideas in proper English and have an understanding of how a resume should be organized and written.

Now, the bad news. You can forget most of the rules and principles you were taught when you were writing papers in high school or college. Those principles just don’t apply to resumes. Resumes are business documents and, as such, they follow certain conventions that business people take for granted but conventions that would make most English teachers cringe.

Following are five simple writing principles that apply specifically to resumes. All of them might come in handy when you begin to string words together in your resume, especially when the time comes to describe your work history.

1. Avoid the first person pronoun

The pronoun I has no place in a resume — and for a logical reason: Who else would you be talking about if not yourself?

Instead of this:

I demonstrated professionalism, tact, and diplomacy while I worked with our customers in high-pressure situations.

Write this:

Demonstrated professionalism, tact, and diplomacy while working with customers in high-pressure situations.

2. Keep your sentences short and don’t worry about fragments

Resumes call for short, crisp statements. These statements do not necessarily have to be complete sentences. You can frequently leave out the articles a, an, and the.

Instead of this:

Spent three years working on major accounts, as both a lead generator and a closer, demonstrating proven skill in organizing and managing a territory with efficiency as well as in developing customer databases.

Write this:

Spent three years working on major accounts. Generated leads and closed sales. Demonstrated proven skill in organizing and managing a territory and in developing customer databases.

3. Try a bulleted format:

  • Created and implemented statistical reports for large metropolitan hospital.
  • Analyzed costs with spreadsheet software.
  • Created database to track patient visits.

4. Use plain English

Don’t be victimized by the myth that the bigger the word you use, the more impressed the reader will be with your intelligence. Keep things simple. Go easy on the adjectives.

5. Go from general to specific

Sequence the information in a section by beginning with a general statement and following it with more specific ones.

Instead of this:

Supervised training of seven toy-making elves. Responsible for all toy-making and customer-related activities in Santa’s workshop. Answered customer complaints during peak season. (Note that the second of these two sentences is more general than the first.)

Write this:

Responsible for all toy-making and customer-related activities in Santa’s workshop. Supervised training of seven toy-making elves. Answered customer complaints during peak season.


Source: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/five-tips-for-better-resume-writing.html

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